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PRACTICE AREAS:

Corporate

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Mongolia’s legal and business environment has oftentimes struggled to keep pace with efficient and balanced regulation of market players. Over the last two decades Mongolia has made significant strides toward building proper legal environment for business and investment. Especially significant pieces of legislation have been passed in the recent years to regulate and facilitate M&A, foreign investment, joint ventures, corporate finance, securities markets, PPP, business structuring and investment funds.
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Banking & Finance

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Banking sector prevails in financial sector of Mongolia. Main objective of the Central Bank (Bank of Mongolia) is to ensure stability of national currency-tugrug. Bank of Mongolia, under its main objective, supports stable development of economy by ensuring stability of the financial market and banking system. Financial Regulatory Commission is a government organisation and its function is to regulate financial service except for banking, to monitor implementation of relevant legislation and ...

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Real Estate/ Construction

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Construction, land and immovable property are key parts of real estate market in Mongolia. Until 1990: During the years of centrally planned economy the government was solely responsible for financing construction and apartment buildings were being distributed without any fee. Government was the only subject entitled to own land. In the period between 1990-2003 supply of apartments basically stopped and the government focused on developing state policy and ...

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PPP/ Project Finance

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Projects and project financing will be critical to Mongolia’s development over the course of the next two decades. With resource wealth estimated to exceed US$1 trillion in value, Mongolia holds the promise of vast potential for exploration and growth. Beyond the renowned Oyu Tolgoi and Tavan Tolgoi deposits, respectively constituting among the largest undeveloped copper and coking coal reserves in the world, Mongolia lays claim to some 6,000 known deposits of over 75 different minerals, the vast majority of which are likewise undeveloped.

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Energy/ Oil & Gas

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The long-term industrial development plans of Mongolia driven by natural resources should accommodate the exponential growth in demand for energy. However, the energy sector has been experiencing and suffering funding gap for further development. It is estimated that Mongolia will need US$8billion to US$10billion in investments in the next decade or so to unlock its potential in energy sector. It is further anticipated that over 80% of this funding is to come from private investors.

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M&A

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Mongolia, the holder of one of the world’s largest coal and other mineral resources and located close to major Asian economies, has become an attractive acquisition destination for the global and regional mining groups. Abundant with mineral resources coupled with conducive business environment and proximity to China, South Korea, Japan and India, major consumers of mineral resources, this resource rich country is offering lucrative business opportunities for international industry players.

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Mining & Natural Resources

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Despite its recent struggles, mining remains a key sector for Mongolian economy. In order to boost the falling mining revenues, the Government of Mongolia has introduced much anticipated changes to the legal environment governing natural resources in 2014-2015. The requirement of the mandatory government review and approval in foreign investments in Mongolian natural resource businesses (enacted in Law of Mongolia on the Regulation of Foreign Investment in Business Entities...

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Dispute Resolution

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Due to the ongoing economic recession in Mongolia and the fall of commodity prices, many projects and deals did not procure expected outcome of contractual parties. Also, such economic hardship contributes to defaults and lead to disputes and litigation. In addition globalisation, foreign investment and trade fuel rise in the number of international disputes in or outside of Mongolia involving a Mongolian party or Mongolian assets.

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Mr. President János Áder

Welcome to Mongolia!

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